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Post Bulletin
     November 14, 2018      #61-318 PB1 2
 
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Two brown bats cling to the wall just inside the entrance to Mystery Cave in Forestville State Park. A fungus linked to white-nose syndrome was found in the park in 2015. The syndrome killed hundreds of bats at Lake Vermilion-Soudan Underground Mine State Park.

Jennifer Simonson, MPR
How to help hibernating bats defeat fungal disease?

By John Molseed
jmolseed@postbulletin.com


Researchers will be keeping an eye on Southeast Minnesota caves this winter.

Bat populations that are being ravaged by a fungal disease spend much of the winter hibernating in area caves. The disease, called white nose syndrome, has killed hundreds, likely thousands, of Minnesota bats.

Bats hibernate at Forestville/Mystery Cave State Park and Crystal Cave in Spring Valley. The number of bats that hibernated at Mystery Cave was down 70 percent last winter, said Andrew Herberg, a mammalogist with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. At Crystal ...

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Andrew Herberg, mammalogist, sets up a net during a bat survey on June 28 at Beaver Creek Valley State Park near Caledonia.

Andrew Link / alink@postbulletin.com
John joined the Post Bulletin in May 2018. He graduated from the University of Iowa in 2004 with a BA in Journalism and Japanese. Away from the office, John plays banjo, brews beer, bikes and is looking for other hobbies that begin with the letter âb.â